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Symposium 2018

ATCA Symposium 2018 – Sydney

17th September 2018

The ATCA Board of Directors invites you to the 2018 Annual General Meeting and ATCA Symposium, which this year takes the theme: Latest Trends, and…You tell us…

TCs are acknowledged as working with the most complex and chaotic populations.  Outcomes, nevertheless, have been shown to be impressive over many studies in Australia and internationally.  As we take up the challenges of the coming years, what will the AOD landscape present, and how do we continue to influence the policy framework through practice-based evidence?

Over the past three years, ATCA in association with our New Zealand members and Matua Raki, has developed the TC Training Course.  After two successful programs in New Zealand, the TC Training Course was adapted for Australian audiences, and has been rolled out across Australia over the past six months.  As we come to the Symposium, more than 170 participants will have completed the training in Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Adelaide – and in the coming weeks further courses will be offered in Canberra and Melbourne. This is just one of the initiatives we have introduced as part of our Workforce Development strategy.

The ATCA Standard is now imbedded in the Quality Assurance model, with a growing number of our services – both TCs and Residential Rehabilitation Services (RRS) – undertaking certification against the Standard.  While we have had some limitations in terms of roll-out, a second Certifying Body is expected to be in place before the ATCA’s AGM – providing more opportunities for all our members to undertake the certification process.

One of our key challenges right now is to inspire those coming through our programs and entering into TCs as staff, to maintain the enthusiasm, the passion and the commitment to the TC model. 

So – a challenge to our members – as you register your delegates for this year’s Symposium – bring with you at least one of your newest staff members – these are our emerging leaders and the people who will carry our TCs forward into the next decades as we address the issues ahead of us. Help us to support and nurture them to become passionate about TCs.

Please click on the link below to view the ATCA Symposium Program and registration form.

Symposium Program, 17 September 2018 (PDF)

Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (SA) Inc (ADAC)

 

FOOTSTEPS – ROAD TO  RECOVERY
PORT AUGUSTA

P: (08) 8641 2116

F: (08) 8641 1832

E: [email protected]
www.footsteps.adac.org.au

STEPPING STONES DAY CENTRE
PORT AUGUSTA

P: 08 8641 3135

E: [email protected]
www.steppingstones.adac.org.au

STEPPING STONES DAY CENTRE
CEDUNA

P: (08) 8625 3530

E: [email protected]
www.steppingstones.adac.org.au

The Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (SA) Inc  (ADAC) is unique as it is the only Indigenous peak body of its kind in Australia, representing over 30 Aboriginal Community Organisations from across South Australia.

ADAC services offer:

  • Footsteps – Road to recovery alcohol and drug residential rehabilitation
  • Stepping Stones alcohol and drug (non residential) centres (Port Augusta, Ceduna)
  • Makin Tracks (community AOD education)

ADAC is a proud employer of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and regards its human resources, cultural integrity and service partnerships as key components to the success of its services.

TARGET GROUP and AREA

The catchment area for clients accessing ADAC services covers almost 900,000 klms across NW SA and includes;

Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yangyantjara Lands + communities Maralinga Tjarajara Lands + Oak Valley Scottdesco
Ceduna + 11 homelands Marree Port Augusta Whyalla
Coober Pedy Oodnadatta Port Lincoln Yalata Community
Konnibba Penong Roxby Downs  

FOOTSTEPS – ROAD to RECOVERY

The 12-bed service operates 24 hours per day, 365 days per year.

Footsteps offers a 12-week program that focuses on the social, psychological and behavioural aspects of harmful alcohol and drug use, using community support and self reflection to heal.  The program encourages personal growth and behavior change.

The culturally inclusive program includes:

–  Group therapy
–  Counselling
–  Alcohol & drug education and strategies
–  Health education & activities
–  Life skills development
–  Social connections and interaction
–  Cultural connectedness & activities
–  Development of supportive networks

With support from Footsteps staff and other residents in the community, a person’s individual success is dependent on their commitment to change and taking responsibility for their own recovery.

REFERRALS

Referrals are accepted from Alcohol and Drug services, Aboriginal Community Health Centers, Prisons, other Agencies, Mental Health Units, and Hospitals,

Referrals must include initial screening to determine whether a client is eligible

ENTRY ASSESSMENT

 After a referral is accepted, a person undergoes various admission assessments to assist Footsteps provide the best care during their stay.  Referring agents are able to help them with this. (Potential residents with complex needs may require further assessments before entering the rehab).  Where referral agents cannot assist in obtaining assessments and completing forms please contact our nearest Stepping Stones Drug and Alcohol centers or Aboriginal Community Health services, for assistance.

DURATION OF THE PROGRAM

The Footsteps program takes 12 weeks (three months) for completion.

PROGRAM GOALS

We know that people don’t just have a drug & alcohol problem. While abstinence from alcohol and other drugs is one people’s goal, many other individual goals can be reached, for example, improved family and other relationships, improved social and work skills, improved health, improved parenting skills, building self esteem, positive social interaction, healthy lifestyle and supports.  Residents are supported to plan and achieve their own, short term and long term goals.

ON LEAVING

We help residents to develop their own plan to maintain their recovery and prevent relapse, before they exit. Residents are connected to the one of our Day Centers and other key agencies for continued support once they are near completing the program.

STEPPING STONES ALCOHOL AND DRUG CENTRES

Stepping Stones provides a range of treatment and non-residential programs to Aboriginal people who are experiencing problems caused by harmful alcohol and drug use.

Stepping Stones focuses on  a harm minimization approach providing support and treatment referrals for people who misuse petrol, alcohol, cannabis, methamphetamine and other substances. Clients are also supported pre and post residential rehabilitation on their pathway to recovery.

Stepping Stones provide an informal setting for clients wanting daily support:

–  Counselling
–  Treatment planning
–  Health check up
–  Health and alcohol and drug education
–  Daily support including:
–  Shower and laundry facilities
–  Breakfast and lunch.

Day activities, (developed in consultation with Aboriginal men and women who access the service), which includes:

–  peer support groups
–  arts and crafts
–  music therapy
–  life skills
–  employment and computer skills
–  recreational and family activities

The Stepping Stones team includes a health practitioner, an alcohol and drug worker and support staff who work closely with clients who access the service and link them with specialist and support services.

Outreach staff from Stepping Stones also work with Aboriginal communities in the region to assist them to address harmful alcohol and drug use.

Resources

Australian and New Zealand Evaluation Tools and Guidelines

Review of the Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set, January 2011

Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set 2012-2013: Specifications and Collection Manual

Diagnostic screening tool

Screening, Assessment and Evaluation: AOD, smoking and gambling. Matua Raki, National Addiction Workforce Development, New Zealand

Te Whare Tapa Whã: Maori Health Model

The Case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand

 

Education and Reviews

Towards better practice in therapeutic communities

Scottish Addiction Studies on-line library

Individual Study Project

NIDA Report – What is a Therapeutic Community?

The Drug Misuse – UK Psychosocial Guideline

Addiction Treatment is Everybody’s Business: Where to from here? National Committee for Addiction Treatment, New Zealand 2011

Competencies for Substance Abuse Treatment Clinical Supervisors TAP 21-A, US Department of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA, 2007

Let’s Get Real: Guide for Managers and Leaders, New Zealand Ministry of Health, 2009

Defining Drug Courts: The Key Components, US Department of Justice, 2004

Working with People in the Criminal Justice Sector: Reflective Workbook. Matua Raki, National Addiction Workforce Development, New ZealandSupporting New Zealand’s Therapeutic Community Workforce: An investigation of current needs. A scoping report developed by Matua Raki for the Ministry of Health

 

Research Papers

Magor-Blatch, L.E., Keen, J.L., & Bhullar, N. (2013). Personality factors as predictors of program completion of drug therapeutic communities Mental Health and Substance Use. doi.org/10.1080/17523281.2013.806345

Gholab, K. M. & Magor-Blatch, L.E. (2013). Predictors of retention in “Transitional” Rehabilitation: Dynamic versus Static Client Variables. Therapeutic Communities: International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 34(1) 16-29.                                                                                                                                                            Gholab, K. & Magor-Blatch, L.E. Predictors of retention

Lifeline through Art, Odyssey House NSW. Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser, Wednesday 5/12/2012
Lifeline through Art – Odyssey House NSW

Smith, B., Gailitis, L. & Bowen, D.J. (2012). A preliminary evaluation of Goldbridge adventure therapy substance abuse treatment program. Unpublished manuscript, Goldbridge Rehabilitation Services, Southport, Australia.
Goldbridge Bowen (2012) A preliminary evaluation

International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 31(2) Summer 2010
International Journal Therapeutic Communities, 2010, 31(2)

James Pitts, Cost benefits of Therapeutic Community programming. Den Haag, June 2009
James Pitts – Cost benefits of TCs

Magor-Blatch, L. (2008). Substance use in the 21st Century: Different or More of the Same? In Psych,3(5). The Australian Psychological Society
Magor-Blatch, L. (2008) InPsych

Stace, S. (2007). Individual Study Project: Are staff training needs adequately addressed in Therapeutic Communities in relation to working with residents who have a diagnosis of personality Disorder? Stirling University, UK.
Stace, Individual Study Project on Therapeutic Communities

Darke, S., Williamson, A., Ross, J., & Teesson, M. (2006). Residential Rehabilitation for the Treatment of Heroin dependence: Sustained Heroin Abstinence and Drug Related Harm 2 years after Treatment Entrance. Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment, 5(1), 9-18
Darke, S., Williamson, A., Ross, J. & Teesson, M. (2006). Residential_Rehabilitation_for_the_Treatment_of.2[1]

James Pitts, Possible contributing factors to the deterioration of client profiles at Odyssey House, WFTC Conference, Spain 2004
James Pitts – Possible Contributors to deterioration Client Profiles

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2002). What is a Therapeutic Community?
Therapeutic Communities Research 03

Waters, G. (2001). The Case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand.
Waters, The case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand 2011

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2009-10: report on the National Minimum Data Set
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420496

Around 170,000 treatment episodes for alcohol and other drug use were provided in Australia in 2009-10. Almost half were for treatment related to alcohol use-the highest proportion observed since the collection began in 2001. As with previous years, counselling was the most common type of treatment offered. One in ten episodes involved more than one type of treatment.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in New South Wales 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420789

In New South Wales in 2009-10, 258 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies and outlets provided 35,202 treatment episodes. This was an increase of eight treatment agencies and 309 episodes compared to 2008-09.Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern, rising from 51% of episodes in 2008-09 to 54% in 2009-10. Cannabis accounted for 18% and heroin for 10% of episodes. The proportion of amphetamine-related episodes fell slightly from 9% to 7%. Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (34% of episodes), followed by withdrawal management (20%) and assessment only (16%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Western Australia 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420899

In Western Australia in 2009–10, 52 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 17,187 treatment episodes. This was an increase of eight treatment agencies and 272 treatment episodes compared with 2008–09. The median1 ages of persons receiving treatment for their own drug use (30) and those seeking assistance for someone else’s drug use (47) were similar to 2008–09. Alcohol (49%), cannabis (19%) and amphetamines (14%) were again the top three drugs of concern. As in 2008–09, counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (63% of episodes), followed by withdrawal management (8%), rehabilitation and information and education only (both 6%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Queensland 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420900

In Queensland in 2009-10, 118 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 23,090 treatment episodes. Alcohol and cannabis were the most common principal drugs of concern at 38% and 36% of treatment episodes respectively, followed by opioids (8%).The greatest proportion of treatment episodes was for information and education only (42%) followed by counselling (28%) and assessment only (17%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in the Australian Capital Territory 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420901

In the Australian Capital Territory in 2009-10, 10 publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 3,585 treatment episodes. Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern (55%), followed by cannabis (17%) and heroin (14%). These proportions were similar to the previous year. Episodes reporting amphetamines as their principal drug of concern dropped by 3 percentage points from 9% in 2008-09 to 6% in 2009-10. The most common form of treatment in 2009-10 was counselling accounting for 30% of treatment episodes, followed by withdrawal management (21%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in the Northern Territory 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420902

In the Northern Territory in 2009-10, 20 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 3,798 treatment episodes. This represented one less treatment agency and around 40 extra treatment episodes compared with 2008-09. Alcohol was the principal drug on concern for 69% of treatment episodes in 2009-10 the highest proportion of all states and territories. The most common form of main treatment provided was assessment only (39% of episodes), followed by counselling (21%), and rehabilitation (16%). The proportion of clients receiving withdrawal management (detoxification) as their main treatment fell from 15% of episodes in 2008-09 to 7% in 2009-10.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Victoria 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420903

In Victoria, 138 publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies and outlets supplying data provided 52,133 treatment episodes in 2009-10. This was an increase of two agencies and about 5,000 treatment episodes compared with 2008-09. Alcohol (46%), cannabis (23%), opioids (19%, with heroin alone accounting for 14%), and amphetamines (5%) were the most common principal drugs of concern. Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (accounting for 51% of episodes) followed by withdrawal management (detoxification) (19%) and support and case management only (13%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in South Australia 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420904

In South Australia in 2009-10, 59 publicly-funded government and non-government alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 9,092 treatment episodes. This was an increase of four treatment agencies but a decrease of 572 treatment episodes from 2008-09. Alcohol was again the most common principal drug of concern (56%), followed by amphetamines (11%) and cannabis (10%). Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided in 2009-10 (accounting for 27% of episodes) a change from recent years, in which the predominant treatment type was assessment only.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Tasmania 2008-09: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=6442475597

This data bulletin summarises the main findings from the 2008-09 Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS-NMDS) for Tasmania.

 

Australian Government’s National Drug Strategy 2010-2015
http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/internet/drugstrategy/publishing.nsf/Content/DB4076D49F13309FCA257854007BAF30/$File/nds2015.pdf

http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/internet/drugstrategy/publishing.nsf/Content/545C92F95DF8C76ACA257162000DA780/$File/indigeval-final.pdf

 

Australian Government’s National Drug Strategy

http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Complimentary Action Plan 2003-2009

 

 

Click here to download the Adobe Acrobat Reader to view PDFs

Media Releases

ATCA Conference Press Release – Perth

2011 Awards for Excellence in Drug Treatment

Canberra Times Opinion Piece – NSPs in prisons – 7 January 2011

Prison TC programmes help cut crime 1st November 2010

Opinion piece – Sydney Morning Herald 3rd September 2010

Canberra Times article July 2010

17th September 2009

14th September 2009

21st August 2008

30th May 2008

30th April 2008

14th April 2008

24th February 2008

18th June 2007

21st May 2007

22nd April 2007

23rd March 2007

7th February 2007

Opinion piece – Celebrity Rehab

 

Scott Wilson, Director

Scott is the Director of Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council, (ADAC). He is an Aboriginal man from the Stolen Generation.  Scott has a background of polydrug use, which brought him into contact with both law enforcement and health agencies during his youth.

In 1994, Scott was appointed Acting Director of the Aboriginal Drug and Alcohol Council (SA) Inc., and then in 1995 became the Director, a position he has held ever since. Since working at ADAC, Scott has drawn on his understandings from his own background and so ADAC has a harm minimisation focus. Scott’s commitment and involvement in the Indigenous substance misuse field sees him in a variety of organisations and committees, including:

  • 2001-2014 – Deputy Chairperson of the National Indigenous Drug and Alcohol Committee (NIDAC; Formerly called the National Drug Strategy Reference Group for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples). Appointed by the Prime Minister.
  • 1997-2014 – Council Member and Executive member of the Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD). Ministerial appointment.
  • 2001-2012 – Director and then Deputy Chairperson of the Alcohol Education and Rehabilitation Foundation (now called the Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education – FARE)
  • 1998-2007- Executive Director, the Alcohol and Other Drugs Council of Australia (ADCA). Appointed by the Prime Minister.
  • 1997-2005 – Ministerial appointment, National Aboriginal Torres Strait Islander Health Council.
  • 2001-2004 – Ministerial Appointment, National School Drug Education Committee
  • 2001-2004 – National Inhalants Taskforce
  • 2004-2006 – Board Member, National Drug Research Institute
  • 1997-2003 – Board Member National Centre for Education and Training in Addictions
  • 1998-2002 – National Cannabis Strategy Taskforce
  • 2004-2005 – National Illicit Drug Strategy State Reference Committee (SA)
  • 1998 – 2011 – National Illicit Drug Strategy Media Campaign Reference Committee

Scott’s contribution has been recognised in 1997 by the ADCA Australia Day Award; in 2003 by the Australian Centenary Medal; in 2012 by the University of Sydney’s, Sister Alison Bush Medal and in 2017 APSAD First Peoples Award.

  

The Salvation Army – Pathways Shoalhaven

Phone: 02 4422 4604

31 Moss Street
Nowra NSW 2541

Po Box 280
Nowra NSW 2541

Email:               [email protected]
Web Address:   www.salvos.org.au/recovery

Pathways Shoalhaven is a service providing assessment, referral, treatment and support for people over 18 years experiencing problems associated with alcohol and other drug use. Whatever the journey that brings a person to our service, and whatever their personal beliefs and values, the goal of Pathways Shoalhaven is to assist people to develop the skills they need to be free of addiction and achieve the quality of life they desire.

Our qualified case workers assist people in developing their own recovery plan and provide support through:

  • One-to-one support and casework
  • Therapeutic and educational group sessions
  • Support and advocacy in accessing residential detox and rehabilitation
  • Referral to a range of other services and programs

Our therapeutic and educational group sessions include:

  • Drug and alcohol education
  • Relapse prevention and management
  • Developing a healthy and positive lifestyle
  • Values and goals identification
  • Strategies around harm reduction

The service is open Monday to Friday from 9.00am – 5.00pm. Clients can be referred from another service or self-refer either by phone or in person.

YSAS Birribi

YSAS Birribi

 

 

 

 

Phone: 1800 009 121
Fax: (03) 9430-2301
10 Eucalyptus Road, Eltham 3095
P.O. Box 264 ELTHAM 3095

YSAS (Youth Support and Advocacy Service) is a quality accredited organization that enables young people to build on their strengths and deal with a range of significant issues relating to alcohol and/or drug use, mental health and legal matters. This includes early intervention programs that assist young people and families to prevent the escalation of any problems.

Birribi is a 15-bed Residential Rehabilitation Program, located in the north-east of Melbourne, for young people aged 15-20 years who are endeavouring to manage their alcohol and/or other drug problems. The average program stay is three months.

The holistic program comprises a mix of group and individual therapy, recreational, vocational and educational activities, with an overall focus on community living and shared responsibility.

For more information, visit: www.ysas.org.au

 

ONE80TC – Teen Challenge NSW Inc


Phone:          1800 679 657
Fax:                02 4776 1460
Address:       PO Box 307, Richmond NSW 2753|
Email:            [email protected]
Web Address:         www.one80tc.org

ONE80TC is a not-for-profit organisation, established in 1974 to provide long-term residential treatment and rehabilitation services for young men (aged 18-35) wanting to overcome addiction and other life controlling issues.

ONE80TC is a Christian based organisation that believes a spiritual foundation is essential. We recognise that we are emotional, physical and spiritual beings, and a holistic approach is required to achieve success and long-term freedom. Our vision is to help people put their lives back together and set them on the pathway to success.

In addition to rehabilitative services, participants are encouraged to integrate back into the community and prepare to enter or re-enter the workforce or gain further education. The service also assists people with dual diagnosis.

The participative residential program, based in the Hawkesbury area of NSW, has provided assistance to over 5,000 young men with a focus on self-identity; family and relationships (including reconciliation); personal development; and work and responsibilities. The facility has 45 beds and is supported by 25 staff.

ONE80TC reaches out into the community by providing day programs and our schools education program NEO-Not Even Once.

If you need help, then don’t delay and Call today 1800 679 657

Photo/Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q34WI6dhjPs



 

TESTIMONY:
Hold On Pain Ends – Nick
Nick entered the ONE80TC program in November 2015.
Addicted to alcohol and party drugs, he faced a stint in prison and knew it was time to change his life.

See below:

Higher Ground Drug Rehabilitation Trust

Higher Ground Drug Rehabilitation Trust

 

 

 

 

Phone: +64 9 834 0017
Fax: +64 9 834 0018
118 Beach Road, Te Atatu Peninsula,
AUCKLAND, 0610, NEW ZEALAND

PO Box 45 192, Te Atatu Peninsula,
Waitakere City 0610, New Zealand
Email: 
[email protected]
Web Address: 
www.higherground.org.nz

Higher Ground provides rehabilitation programmes that are based on 12 Step recovery principles. We believe the spiritual dimensions of honesty, open mindedness, willingness, faith, hope, respect and generosity are the foundations of healing. We emphasise that clients need to take individual responsibility for their recovery.

The Higher Ground Drug Rehabilitation Trust was established in Auckland in 1984 to treat the severely dependent. We provide quality abstinence based treatment, within a Therapeutic Community for adult New Zealanders. Our primary focus is our 18 week residential programme. Higher Ground is a Charitable Trust overseen by a Board of Trustees.

 

Awards

ATCA Awards were first introduced in 2008 and each year are presented to individuals and/or organisations that have provided dedicated and innovative leadership, thus enhancing the TC model of treatment for alcohol and other drug issues.  These comprise five categories:

  • ATCA Recognition Award
  • Significant Contribution Award – Individual
  • Significant Contribution Award – Program or Intervention
  • First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award – Organisational Award
  • Excellence in Research and Evaluation Award 

ATCA Award Catergories

ATCA Recognition Award
This award recognises the individuals who have made a contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia over a period of ten years or more. The goal of this Award is to provide public recognition of the dedicated contribution by individuals to the Therapeutic Community movement, by a staff member or volunteer.

ATCA Individual Award
This award recognises the individuals who have made a significant contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia over a considerable period of time. The goal of the Significant Contribution: Individual Award is to acknowledge and publicly recognise the exceptional work done by people who have worked tirelessly over a number of years to promote and develop the therapeutic community approach to treatment within the sector.

ATCA Significant Contribution Award
This award recognises an exemplary or commendable contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia made by a program or intervention. Any TC treatment provider or intervention is eligible.

First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award. Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Organisational Award
This award recognises organisations that have made a contribution to the Therapeutic Community (TC) movement in Australasia by way of innovation and forming Partnerships that make Therapeutic communities culturally safe and relevant to first nation’s people. 

The goal of this Award is to provide public recognition work done to include first nations peoples in the delivery of Therapeutic Community programs either by way of innovation or the formulation of partnerships that directly benefit First Nations residents.

Excellence in Research and Evaluation Award
Therapeutic Community research is essential to the development of effective and informed strategies to improve the lives of clients and residents accessing TC services and programs.  This award recognises the individuals, research teams and TCs that have contributed to evidence-based research and evaluation of TC services and programs.

Awardees in the category of ATCA Recognition Award receive a certificate, presented at the annual ATCA Conference or Symposium.

Winners in other categories receive an engraved glass trophy, presented at the annual ATCA Conference or Symposium.

ATCA Award Guidelines
Eligibility

  • The awards are only open to current members of ATCA and may include other organisations outside the membership with which ATCA organisational members have partnered
  • Nominations should be completed on the appropriate form for each category and all relevant sections of the nomination form(s) should be completed
  • Each nomination is restricted to one category
  • Should a program be nominated in more than one category by different nominators, clarification will be sought from the nominee as to the category in which they wish their nomination to be judged
  • To be eligible for nomination in the service, program or intervention category, the service, program or intervention is required to be in operation during the awards period
  • To be eligible for nomination in the individual category, the individual is required to be employed by the nominating agency/organisation at the time of nomination and when the awards are presented
  • Each nomination requires the endorsement of the Director/Chief Executive Officer of the identified agency/organisation and nominee
  • Any additional information (attachments) must accompany the appropriate nomination form(s) or be mailed to ATCA at the advertised address and be received by the advertised closing date

Judging

  • Nominations will be assessed by a panel of people appointed by the ATCA Board to judge each award
  • Awards will be judged according to the criteria outlined for each of the award categories
  • More than one award may be granted in each of the main categories, and all eligible nominees for the Recognition Award will be presented with a Certificate of Recognition
  • The judging panels also reserve the right to award a Certificate of Commendation for finalists in the Individual and Organisational categories

Terms and conditions

  • No feedback or discussion will be entered into regarding nominations and award results
  • Nominations can only be made in one category for an individual, service, program or intervention
  • Nominations must address each judging criteria. Applicants that fail to do so will not be considered
  • Nominees must agree to be nominated
  • All nominations, including any attachments, become the property of the event organisers (ATCA)
  • Event organisers reserve the right to publicise all nominations and entrants may be asked to participate in media interviews

Dr Lynne Magor-Blatch
Executive Officer
Australasian Therapeutic Communities Association

PO Box 464
YASS NSW 2582
M:+61 (0)422 904 040
E: [email protected]

______________________________________________________________________________________

2017 ATCA Award Winners

First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award. Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Organisational Award

In 2017 ATCA honoured two of its members in this category:

  • Odyssey House Victoria Women’s Koori Justice Program aims to “close the gap” for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples seeking support and intervention for addiction and associated issues. Initial successes in the program’s Circuit Breaker program showed 20% of the population were Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander, and these residents were making up 25% of program completions. This compared with 2% Aboriginal engagement in all other programs across the organisation.

Consultation with Aboriginal community elders and the employment of suitably qualified and respected individuals, lead to the development of an Aboriginal Advisory Group and Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group, ratified in 2013, and in 2017, the organisation has submitted its “Stretch RAP”.

The organisation has collaborated widely, they have engaged in professional development and addressed a range of AOD health related issues and have increased the number of Aboriginal service users across the whole organisation.

  • Goldbridge and The Henderson first established a partnership in 2014, which included individual mentoring sessions to identify strengths and awareness for the future. This was further developed in 2016 to provide a unique support program to First Nation’s people leaving prison and in 2017, this partnership has further expanded through the work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people who are undertaking sentences within Gatton Correctional Facility, linking them with the TC’s many services for support for AOD issues on release.

The establishment of an Advisory Group has assisted in this work, providing objective clinical and program advice to ensure residents are receiving culturally secure advice and support.

Excellence in Research and Evaluation: Therapeutic Community Research Award

  • WHOS; Illawarra Institute for Mental Health, University of Wollongong; and NDARC, University of New South Wales formed a partnership across three organisations, including two university-based research institutes, to improve the capacity of people living with co-occurring mental illness, establishing a program of research at the commencement of the project. The longitudinal action research designed study aimed to:
  1. Identify the capacity of TCs to address co-occurring mental illness; and
  2. Identify and articulate implementation strategies that can guide improvements in the way that TCs respond to mental illness comorbidities.

Throughout the study, the group addressed a number of secondary outcomes including identification of health needs, such as smoking, healthy lifestyles and health literacy.  The team has now completed seven annual reviews across the 9-year project.  The use of the DDCAT has shown the organisation is Dual Diagnosis Capable, and is a world-first in the TC context, leading to both publications and conference presentations.

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

In 2017, after due consideration, the judges agreed to highly commend a program that has made a long-term commitment to Harm Reduction, and to the education and promotion of wellbeing, healthy lifestyle and harm reduction initiatives across the six TCs that come under the organisation’s umbrella:  

  • The WHOS Harm Reduction Program has made a progressively expanding commitment to harm reduction commencing in 1986 in step with the Commonwealth Government’s Harm Minimisation approach to the Drug Strategy. Education is essential to ensure the message of safe drug use and safe sex is being received by the clients accessing the organisation’s services. There is an emphasis on overdose prevention and Harm Reduction Workers are allocated to each service and nursing staff oversee onsite clinics, liaising with community GPs, Sexual Health Services and BBV services.

Significant Contribution to Therapeutic Community Organisational Development –  Individual Award

In 2017, we recognised the work of one individual whose contribution to the development and growth of the TC model within his own organisation has been significant:

  • Brian Holt, Therapy and Operations Manager, Odyssey House New South Wales has been working in Odyssey House residential services for the past 25 years. He is a senior graduate of the residential program who commenced his employment with Odyssey in a therapist role in 1992. In 1996, he was appointed to the role of Coordinator at the Admissions and Referral Centre, and after 9 years moved to the position of Manager of the Odyssey House Admissions and Referral Centre and Withdrawal Unit.  In 2005, the Withdrawal Unit was presented with the Excellence in Treatment Award at the National Awards.  In 2010, with a number of organisational changes being made, the recipient of this award moved into a new position overseeing three departments across two treatment sites and in 2015, he assumed a new role managing the Therapy department.

Brian demonstrates his ongoing commitment and support to residents in treatment as he embraces the ethos of the Therapeutic Community with integrity and passion.  He is a living inspiration to Odyssey House staff and residents and over the years has provided support to approximately 15,500 clients.

Honorary Life Membership

In 2017, the ATCA Board agreed to expand the ATCA Affiliate membership category and establish Honorary Life Membership, which may be granted to an individual in recognition of commitment and services rendered to the Association and its membership.

Each nomination for Honorary Life Membership must be considered on its merits and the following principles considered in granting Honorary Life Membership:

  • Honorary Life Membership is a great honour.
  • It is not considered as a competitive process.
  • Nominees must be considered individually and on their personal attributes, achievements, commitment and contribution to the Therapeutic Community model and to the Association and its membership.
  • Honorary Life Membership is reserved for those whose contribution goes beyond the ordinary for an extended period of time.

In 2017, ATCA honoured two individuals who have had long and active membership of ATCA and the ATCA Board.  They have demonstrated significant contribution to the Association and in the national, state and territory arenas that has furthered the position of the Association and its membership.

Barry Evans and James Pitts were honoured for their significant and considerable contribution to the Association and its members over more than 30 years.

 

 ATCA Recognition Award

In 2014, sixteen awards were made in this category to people who have provided more than 10 years’ service to the TC movement in Australia and New Zealand. The ATCA congratulates the following people:

  • Katharine Manning – Turning Point, Gold Coast Recovery Services
  • Lani Time – Program Manager, Gold Coast Recovery Services
  • Pat Harvey – Team Leader, Gold Coast Recovery Services
  • Tony Murray – Support Worker, Fairhaven’s Withdrawal Unit and Bridge Program
  • Traci Wilkins – Senior Case Worker, The Salvation Army William Booth House
  • Ben Williams – Chair, Goldbridge Board
  • Dr Morgan O’Brien – Member Goldbridge Board
  • Maureen Oldfield – Member of the Goldbridge Board
  • Barbara Hill – Treasurer and Accounts Manager Goldbridge Board
  • Toni Eachus – Operations Manager, Goldbridge
  • Janina Lace – Yoga and Meditation Instructor Goldbridge
  • Marie-Claire Manganaro-Sclater – TC Team Leader Goldbridge
  • Ralph Fletcher – volunteer supervisor Goldbridge
  • John Bartlett – Founder and CEO, Fresh Hope
  • Karen Bartlett – Founder, Fresh Hope
  • Jessica Walshe – Clinical Manager, Odyssey House Victoria

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2016 ATCA Award Winners

First Nations Innovation and Partnership Award. Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Organisational Award

  • Drug and Alcohol Services Association (DASA) Alice Springs Indigenous Outreach Program.
    Excellence in Research and Evaluation: Therapeutic Community Research Award

2016 was the first year this award was presented, and judges congratulated all nominees for their high standard of work in this area.  Two of the nominations stood out and were considered a credit to the vibrant work that is happening within ATCA.  Both organisations demonstrated and sustained an impressive and varied amount of research.  Both nominations are persuasive in terms of narrative and story, as well as empirically robust.  Overall, their client work and research amount to a formula for winning hearts and minds.  The case for the awards is strong and finely presented.

Excellence in Research and Evaluation: Therapeutic Community Research Award

  • The Salvation Army Recovery Services and Illawarra Institute for Mental Health, University of Wollongong Research Partnership Executive Team: Mr Gerard Byrne, Major Rick Hoffman, Prof Frank Deane, and Dr Peter Kelly.
  • Highly CommendedHigher Ground Research Committee, in association with Julian King Associates

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

  • The Endeavour Dual Diagnosis Bridge Program
  • Highly Commended: Cyrenian House for the development and implementation of the Residential Pathways Program

Special Award for Leadership and Innovation

  • James Pitts

James has provided leadership and innovation to the TC sector over more than 32 years.  He has been a giant in our field, who has made a significant contribution to the lives of over 30,000 people.  The list of committees, Boards and expert groups on which he has served is long – and he has received a number of honours and awards over his long career.  He was a founding member of ATCA and has significantly expanded the benefit of the Therapeutic Community environment for people seeking recovery from addiction.

He has been a long-time advocate of the Therapeutic Community model of treatment and is highly regarded for his innovation and expertise in this field.  We will miss him as he retires from the sector, although we hope this will herald a new opportunity for him to support others within the sector to maintain fidelity in the TC model in their own services.

In 2016, ATCA was proud to honour someone who has an outstanding list of contributions over a lifetime of achievement.

ATCA Recognition Award

In 2016, 20 awards were made in this category to people who have provided more than 10 years’ service to the TC movement in Australia and New Zealand. ATCA congratulates the following people:

  • Wendy Shannon – Cyrenian House from 2002 to 2008 and Palmerston from 2011.
  • Craig Stephens– Centre Manager of the Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Bernie Muendel– Program Director at The Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Janet Rees– Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Jacqui Kelly– Senior Case Worker at The Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Lorraine Fulton– Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Mykel Carlson– Case Worker at The Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Phil Bowers– Case Worker at The Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Sam Brammall– Case Worker at The Dooralong Transformation Centre
  • Gerard Byrne – Operations Manager for The Salvation Army Recovery Services, which has services in NSW, QLD and the ACT.
  • Angie Keir – Karralika Programs in the ACT and more recently with Canberra Recovery Services.
  • Greg Driscoll – Team Leader at the Canberra Recovery Services.
  • Mel Stott – Ted Noffs Foundation
  • Kieran Palmer – Chief Clinical Officer/Psychologist Ted Noffs Foundation
  • Marg Lacy – Assessment and Intake worker, YSAS Birribi.
  • Kevin McGuigan – Property Worker, YSAS Birribi
  • Damian Philp – Manager, YSAS Birribi
  • Mette Hemmingsen – Residential Youth Worker, YSAS Birribi
  • Donna Stevens – YSAS Birribi
  • Patricia Serratore – YSAS Birribi

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2015 ATCA Award Winners

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

In 2015, the judging panel agreed to award two nominees in this category:

  • The WHOS New Beginnings Program has a demonstrated history of utilising and building best practice for women specific AOD work, using group work, supportive counselling, women’s health support and education, stress management skills development and referral.

Relationship issues, parenting, self-esteem building, social and communication skills, assertiveness skills training and boundary setting are all important areas for this TC service, which can accommodate up to 24 women at any given time.

  • The Alcohol and Drug Treatment Courtproject is an innovative and collaborative therapeutic jurisprudence pilot project, which has been established between the New Zealand Ministry of Health and Ministry of Justice. The treatment component is accomplished through a strong network between three providers: Odyssey Auckland as Lead Provider, Higher Ground and the Salvation Army. The network has a strong working relationship with the court.

From a treatment perspective, the network between the providers comprises dedicated case management and peer support, and a wrap-around model of support which ensures continuity of care in an individualized format.

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an Individual

In 2015, the Awards Committee made two awards in this category:

  • Rawiri Pene is a fantastic ambassador for the therapeutic community treatment movement and his work has been significant in propelling Higher Ground (Auckland, New Zealand) forward in working towards a fully bi-cultural program. In addition to his work at Higher Ground, Rawiri also provides the Pou Oranga role for the Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Court Network. In this role, he plays a significant part in the reduction of Maori being missed by the system and ending up in prison. He works tirelessly with many organisations to help Maori and others gain access to appropriate treatment.
  • Lance Jefferys works with the Department of Corrections, Hawkes Bay Regional Prison. From the commencement of his association with the therapeutic model of treatment, Lance has had a passion for the TC as a method of treatment within the prison setting.

His achievements are many and include: Implementation of a 60 beds Drug Treatment Unit (DTU) in collaboration with CareNZ staff; and a 6 months TC Program for Mainstream Prisoners with addiction problems; Joint proposing and opening of the 30 bed Short Term Intensive (STI) DTU TC in July 2012 for segregated prisoners; Stimulated, initiated and facilitated Staff in learning about the model and making it a daily practice; Integration of three circles (Corrections, CareNZ, and Prisoners) on a daily basis; Supporting colleague PCOs in how to facilitate and lead a TC unit from Corrections’ point of view; Using the TC model to stimulate and motivate prisoners towards change; and Using creativity, boundaries and working together with staff and prisoners.


ATCA Recog
nition Award

In 2015, three awards were made in this category to people who have provided more than 10 years’ service to the TC movement in Australia and New Zealand. ATCA congratulates the following people:

  • Andrew Hick(Odyssey Vic)
  • James Kolose(Higher Ground, Auckland)
  • Zarina Norohna-Smith(Odyssey, Auckland)

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2014 ATCA Award Winners

Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia: Program, Service or Intervention

In 2014, the judging panel awarded two nominees in this category and highly commended a third:

  • TheRick Hammersley Centre Therapeutic Community for Improved AOD Treatment Services to GLBTIQ Consumers was highly commended as a program that is making a real difference in breaking down the barriers by creating a culture which fosters continuous quality improvement through staff and consumer participation. This includes building a culture within the organisation that supports GLBTIQ people both at a governance, human resource, and program element levels.
  • WHOS Opioid Treatment Programand The Rick Hammersley Centre Mixed Gender Program and Madjitil Moorna Choir of Aboriginal Reconciliation were jointly awarded for their Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia.
  • A number of TCs are now embarking on the important program area of combining medically assisted treatments within the TC environment. The WHOS Opioid Treatment Programis acknowledged as the leader in this area of treatment, operating two TCs – the WHOS Residential Treatment of Opioid Dependence (RTOD) stabilisation program and the WHOS Methadone to Abstinence Residential (MTAR) reduction program. Expansion of OTP services in 2013 included the Newcastle Day Program, family and aftercare support and onsite dispensing of OST. WHOS OTP Services have been at the in-service provision since 1999.
  • The Rick Hammersley Centre Mixed Gender Program and Madjitil Moorna Choir of Aboriginal Reconciliation was also recognised within this award category. The Madjitil Moorna Choir has been established to develop Partnerships to enable Aboriginal People to connect back to Community.

This innovative partnership provides an avenue for Aboriginal People seeking treatment for their AOD issues to connect back into community in healthy, life affirming ways. Aboriginal residents who attend the choir learn how to sing in Noongar language, perform at public events, and can take up administrative and coordinating roles within the choir upon completion of treatment.

Lead by award-winning Aboriginal songwriters, Madjitil Moorna has performed at major cultural events throughout metropolitan and regional Western Australia. The most recent performance by Aboriginal People in treatment at the TC with Madjitil Moorna was at the 2014 Perth International Arts Festival and at St Georges Cathedral for the NAIDOC Week celebrations.

Significant Contribution: Individual Award

In 2014, this award was made to three people who have made a significant contribution to the TC movement in Australasia over a considerable period of time:

Barry Evans has had a long association with the ATCA and The Buttery, beginning in 1983 when he joined the team at The Buttery as the Art Therapist and counsellor. In 1987 Barry moved into management, and was offered the position of Director in 1988, a position he held until his retirement from The Buttery in July 2014.

Barry was one of the founding members of the ATCA and has worked diligently since that time to maintain and develop the TC method of treatment. In particular, he has spearheaded the association’s work in the development of the ATCA Standard, and it is therefore very fitting that he will be maintain some of this work – even in his “so called” retirement.

Barry has been Director and Chair of the ATCA Board over a number of years, has served on the NADA Board and has been an active member of a number of organisations in the Northern Rivers. In 2009, Barry was inducted into the National Drug and Alcohol Awards Honour Roll.

Wesley Noffs entered the field in 1986 as manager of Life Education Australia, and in 1987 after his father, Ted Noffs, suffered a massive stroke, Wes took up the leadership role of that organisation. By 1990 it was evident that Youth Treatment was an under-resourced area, if not, non-existent. Wes, together with his wife, Amanda, felt compelled to focus on evidence-based treatment and turned the Wayside Foundation into the Ted Noffs Foundation.

Wes has had a long-term commitment to evidence based, accountable and accessible services for young people and has guided Ted Noffs through changes which have impacted on the AOD, youth and related fields as a whole, providing an ever-improving benchmark for good practice and accountability. Ted Noffs now works collaboratively across Australia to provide outreach evidence based, specialised care to rural, urban, indigenous and culturally and linguistically diverse youth and their families.

In 1999 the Ted Noffs Awards were established to honour outstanding individual and organisational contributions in the AOD field and in 2003, and these were followed the National Drug and Alcohol Awards as a collaboration between Ted Noffs, the Alcohol and other Drugs Council of Australia (ADCA), the Australian Drug Foundation (ADF) and the Australian National Council on Drugs (ANCD).

Mandy Noffs has 45 years management experience, and in 1988 joined the Life Education Centre as Public Relations Officer. In 1990 Mandy joined Wes and turned the Wayside Foundation into Ted Noffs Foundation. Since 1990 she has played a critical role in the ongoing development of Ted Noffs Foundation and its programs. Amanda was the Chief Operating Officer up until July 2014.

Mandy has also served as a Board member of the Network of Alcohol & Other Drugs Agencies (NADA) and as a Board Member of Greenpeace Asia Pacific, and alongside Wes has pioneered rehabilitation services for adolescents in Australia and is proud to have built an organisation that continues to grow and help young people in need.

ATCA is fortunate to have had these three pioneers leading the way over a number of years, and fortunately it seems that we will be able to retain their expertise and knowledge for a little while yet from a true ‘retirement’.

On behalf of the membership, we extend congratulations and appreciation for the commitment of Barry, Wes and Mandy.

 ATCA Recognition Award

In 2014, nineteen awards were made in this category to people who have provided more than 10 years’ service to the TC movement in Australia and New Zealand. The ATCA congratulates the following people:

  • Annette D’amore(Odyssey Vic)
  • Barry Daley(WHOS)
  • David Thornton(Windana)
  • Debi Ingram (Odyssey House NSW)
  • Dennis Humphrys(Palmerston)
  • Derek Dunworth(WHOS)
  • Elaine King(Palmerston)
  • Ian O’Brien (Cyrenian House)
  • Ian Porter (Palmerston)
  • Kerrie Lloyd(WHOS)
  • Lea Griffiths(Odyssey House NSW)
  • Min Ni (WHOS)
  • Peter Townsend(WHOS)
  • Rhonda Rooklyn(WHOS)
  • Richard Hillas-Brown(Karralika Programs)
  • Robert Phelps(WHOS)
  • Scott Parker(WHOS)
  • Steve Hocking(WHOS)
  • Troy German(WHOS)

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2013 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • The Salvation Army – Bridge Program

In Recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Major David Pullen – The Salvation Army Recovery Services

In recognition of 10 years’ service to the Therapeutic Community Movement

  • Jennifer Hamilton – Clinical Coordinator Mixed Gender Program, Cyrenian House
  • Linda Santiago – Saranna Program, Cyrenian House

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2012 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Palmerston Association Farm Therapeutic Community– Chiropractic Program.
  • Cyrenian House– for the ongoing development of Cultural Competency within the context of the mainstream TC.

 In Recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Charlie Blatch – Goldbridge – for his significant service to the TC sector over the past 40 years.

 In recognition of 10 years’ service to the Therapeutic Community Movement

  • Miekel Rose – Karralika Program, ACT
  • Christine Tamsett – The Salvation Army Recovery Services, Qld
  • Graham Tamsett – The Salvation Army Recovery Services, Qld
  • Ian Lewis – Odyssey House, Vic
  • Scott Warrington – The Salvation Army Recovery Services, ACT
  • Jacqui Warrington – The Salvation Army Recovery Services, ACT
  • Pat Williams – Odyssey House, Auckland NZ

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2011 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Saranna Women’s and Children’s Program – Cyrenian House WA

In Recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Carol Daws – Cyrenian House WA
  • Murray Sutton – Mirikai, Gold Coast Drug Council Qld
  • James Macgregor – Mirikai, Gold Coast Drug Council Qld

 In recognition of 10 years’ service to the Therapeutic Community Movement

  • Kelvin Dargan – Banyan House NT

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2009 ATCA Award Winners

 In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Alcohol & Other Drug Foundation ACT (ADFACT) – Early Birds Project
  • The Ted Noffs Foundation – Program for Adolescent Life Management (PALM)

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Gerard Byrne – Salvation Army Recovery Services
  • Kim Fleming – Karralika, ADFACT

 In recognition of 10 years’ service to the Therapeutic Community Movement

  • Tony Murray – Salvation Army Gold Coast Recovery Services
  • Lani Time – Salvation Army Gold Coast Recovery Services
  • Scott Drummond – Odyssey House Victoria
  • Laura Petrie – Odyssey House Victoria
  • Geoff Summers – Odyssey House Victoria
  • Therese Power – Karralika Karuna, ADFACT

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2008 ATCA Award Winners

In recognition of a Significant Contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by a program, service or intervention

  • Alcohol & other Drug Foundation ACT (ADFACT) – Karralika Karuna Program
  • Palmerston Farm Vocational Program
  • Higher Ground Rehabilitation Trust

In Recognition of a significant contribution to the Therapeutic Community Movement in Australasia by an individual

  • Johnny Dow – Higher Ground Rehabilitation Trust
  • Kay Welsh – Odyssey House Victoria
  • Meridy Calnin – Odyssey House Victoria
  • Lynne Magor-Blatch – ADFACT Karralika

In recognition of 10 years’ service to the Therapeutic   Community movement:

  • Pam McKenna – Palmerston
  • Trevor Doig – The Salvation Army
  • Dawn Bainbridge – ADFACT Karralika
  • Susan Cordeiro – Odyssey House McGrath Foundation
  • Melissa Cranfield – Odyssey House McGrath Foundation
  • Shirley Wilson – Windana