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Resources

Australian and New Zealand Evaluation Tools and Guidelines

Review of the Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set, January 2011

Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set 2012-2013: Specifications and Collection Manual

Diagnostic screening tool

Screening, Assessment and Evaluation: AOD, smoking and gambling. Matua Raki, National Addiction Workforce Development, New Zealand

Te Whare Tapa Whã: Maori Health Model

The Case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand

 

Education and Reviews

Towards better practice in therapeutic communities

Scottish Addiction Studies on-line library

Individual Study Project

NIDA Report – What is a Therapeutic Community?

The Drug Misuse – UK Psychosocial Guideline

Addiction Treatment is Everybody’s Business: Where to from here? National Committee for Addiction Treatment, New Zealand 2011

Competencies for Substance Abuse Treatment Clinical Supervisors TAP 21-A, US Department of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA, 2007

Let’s Get Real: Guide for Managers and Leaders, New Zealand Ministry of Health, 2009

Defining Drug Courts: The Key Components, US Department of Justice, 2004

Working with People in the Criminal Justice Sector: Reflective Workbook. Matua Raki, National Addiction Workforce Development, New ZealandSupporting New Zealand’s Therapeutic Community Workforce: An investigation of current needs. A scoping report developed by Matua Raki for the Ministry of Health

 

Research Papers

Magor-Blatch, L.E., Keen, J.L., & Bhullar, N. (2013). Personality factors as predictors of program completion of drug therapeutic communities Mental Health and Substance Use. doi.org/10.1080/17523281.2013.806345

Gholab, K. M. & Magor-Blatch, L.E. (2013). Predictors of retention in “Transitional” Rehabilitation: Dynamic versus Static Client Variables. Therapeutic Communities: International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 34(1) 16-29.                                                                                                                                                            Gholab, K. & Magor-Blatch, L.E. Predictors of retention

Lifeline through Art, Odyssey House NSW. Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser, Wednesday 5/12/2012
Lifeline through Art – Odyssey House NSW

Smith, B., Gailitis, L. & Bowen, D.J. (2012). A preliminary evaluation of Goldbridge adventure therapy substance abuse treatment program. Unpublished manuscript, Goldbridge Rehabilitation Services, Southport, Australia.
Goldbridge Bowen (2012) A preliminary evaluation

International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 31(2) Summer 2010
International Journal Therapeutic Communities, 2010, 31(2)

James Pitts, Cost benefits of Therapeutic Community programming. Den Haag, June 2009
James Pitts – Cost benefits of TCs

Magor-Blatch, L. (2008). Substance use in the 21st Century: Different or More of the Same? In Psych,3(5). The Australian Psychological Society
Magor-Blatch, L. (2008) InPsych

Stace, S. (2007). Individual Study Project: Are staff training needs adequately addressed in Therapeutic Communities in relation to working with residents who have a diagnosis of personality Disorder? Stirling University, UK.
Stace, Individual Study Project on Therapeutic Communities

Darke, S., Williamson, A., Ross, J., & Teesson, M. (2006). Residential Rehabilitation for the Treatment of Heroin dependence: Sustained Heroin Abstinence and Drug Related Harm 2 years after Treatment Entrance. Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment, 5(1), 9-18
Darke, S., Williamson, A., Ross, J. & Teesson, M. (2006). Residential_Rehabilitation_for_the_Treatment_of.2[1]

James Pitts, Possible contributing factors to the deterioration of client profiles at Odyssey House, WFTC Conference, Spain 2004
James Pitts – Possible Contributors to deterioration Client Profiles

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2002). What is a Therapeutic Community?
Therapeutic Communities Research 03

Waters, G. (2001). The Case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand.
Waters, The case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand 2011

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2009-10: report on the National Minimum Data Set
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420496

Around 170,000 treatment episodes for alcohol and other drug use were provided in Australia in 2009-10. Almost half were for treatment related to alcohol use-the highest proportion observed since the collection began in 2001. As with previous years, counselling was the most common type of treatment offered. One in ten episodes involved more than one type of treatment.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in New South Wales 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420789

In New South Wales in 2009-10, 258 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies and outlets provided 35,202 treatment episodes. This was an increase of eight treatment agencies and 309 episodes compared to 2008-09.Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern, rising from 51% of episodes in 2008-09 to 54% in 2009-10. Cannabis accounted for 18% and heroin for 10% of episodes. The proportion of amphetamine-related episodes fell slightly from 9% to 7%. Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (34% of episodes), followed by withdrawal management (20%) and assessment only (16%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Western Australia 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420899

In Western Australia in 2009–10, 52 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 17,187 treatment episodes. This was an increase of eight treatment agencies and 272 treatment episodes compared with 2008–09. The median1 ages of persons receiving treatment for their own drug use (30) and those seeking assistance for someone else’s drug use (47) were similar to 2008–09. Alcohol (49%), cannabis (19%) and amphetamines (14%) were again the top three drugs of concern. As in 2008–09, counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (63% of episodes), followed by withdrawal management (8%), rehabilitation and information and education only (both 6%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Queensland 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420900

In Queensland in 2009-10, 118 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 23,090 treatment episodes. Alcohol and cannabis were the most common principal drugs of concern at 38% and 36% of treatment episodes respectively, followed by opioids (8%).The greatest proportion of treatment episodes was for information and education only (42%) followed by counselling (28%) and assessment only (17%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in the Australian Capital Territory 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420901

In the Australian Capital Territory in 2009-10, 10 publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 3,585 treatment episodes. Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern (55%), followed by cannabis (17%) and heroin (14%). These proportions were similar to the previous year. Episodes reporting amphetamines as their principal drug of concern dropped by 3 percentage points from 9% in 2008-09 to 6% in 2009-10. The most common form of treatment in 2009-10 was counselling accounting for 30% of treatment episodes, followed by withdrawal management (21%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in the Northern Territory 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420902

In the Northern Territory in 2009-10, 20 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 3,798 treatment episodes. This represented one less treatment agency and around 40 extra treatment episodes compared with 2008-09. Alcohol was the principal drug on concern for 69% of treatment episodes in 2009-10 the highest proportion of all states and territories. The most common form of main treatment provided was assessment only (39% of episodes), followed by counselling (21%), and rehabilitation (16%). The proportion of clients receiving withdrawal management (detoxification) as their main treatment fell from 15% of episodes in 2008-09 to 7% in 2009-10.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Victoria 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420903

In Victoria, 138 publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies and outlets supplying data provided 52,133 treatment episodes in 2009-10. This was an increase of two agencies and about 5,000 treatment episodes compared with 2008-09. Alcohol (46%), cannabis (23%), opioids (19%, with heroin alone accounting for 14%), and amphetamines (5%) were the most common principal drugs of concern. Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (accounting for 51% of episodes) followed by withdrawal management (detoxification) (19%) and support and case management only (13%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in South Australia 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420904

In South Australia in 2009-10, 59 publicly-funded government and non-government alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 9,092 treatment episodes. This was an increase of four treatment agencies but a decrease of 572 treatment episodes from 2008-09. Alcohol was again the most common principal drug of concern (56%), followed by amphetamines (11%) and cannabis (10%). Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided in 2009-10 (accounting for 27% of episodes) a change from recent years, in which the predominant treatment type was assessment only.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Tasmania 2008-09: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=6442475597

This data bulletin summarises the main findings from the 2008-09 Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS-NMDS) for Tasmania.

 

Australian Government’s National Drug Strategy 2010-2015
http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/internet/drugstrategy/publishing.nsf/Content/DB4076D49F13309FCA257854007BAF30/$File/nds2015.pdf

http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/internet/drugstrategy/publishing.nsf/Content/545C92F95DF8C76ACA257162000DA780/$File/indigeval-final.pdf

 

Australian Government’s National Drug Strategy

http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Complimentary Action Plan 2003-2009

 

 

Click here to download the Adobe Acrobat Reader to view PDFs

Odyssey House Trust, Auckland (NZ)

Odyssey House Trust Inc.

Odyssey House Trust Inc.

 

 

 

 

Tel: +64 9 623 1447
Fax: +64 9 623 9151
Private Bag MBE M230
Auckland 1140
Web Address: www.odyssey.org.nz

 

Ted Noffs Foundation – PALM ACT

Ted Noffs Foundation - PALM ACT

Phone (02) 6123-2400
PO Box 132
WATSON ACT 2602
Email: [email protected]
Web Address: https://noffs.org.au

The Ted Noffs Foundation’s Program for Adolescent Life Management (PALM) is a ten bed community for 13 to 18 year old young people who have experienced problems with their drug or alcohol use and who wish to get their lives back on track.
Surrounded by bush and farmland on a five acre block near the edge of Canberra in Watson, PALM provides a safe and healthy environment where you can get the support you need to work through your problems and develop the skills to make positive changes in your life. You can stay for up to three months but we are also happy to work with you to plan a shorter period that will meet your particular needs.
In your time at PALM you’ll be able to work with individual counsellors and in groups to tackle any problems that drugs or alcohol have caused for you and to investigate ways to cope with pressure and have a happier and more productive lifestyle. We’re also able to offer assistance in dealing with family problems, issues around involvement in crime and mental health concerns. There is also a detox facility attached to PALM for any people who need to withdraw from the physical effects of drugs before they start the program.
It’s not all hard work at PALM. We have a structured program of recreational and fitness activities that includes trips to the movies, gym, bushwalking, bike riding, ice skating and so on. All residents are involved in making decisions about what activities will be on the program each week.

As part of the service we offer young people up to five years of further care once they have left PALM. Our Continuing Adolescent Life Management (CALM) program will keep in touch with you either through face-to-face meetings or by facebook and will provide ongoing support in dealing with any problems that you’re having. As well as helping you to avoid relapsing in to drug use, we’re able to assist you in looking for a job, going back to school or other education, finding accommodation and reconnecting with your family.
We have also opened up a 5 bedroom home for young people who have left PALM and need support to maintain a safe and affordable tenancy during their continued recovery. These young people are supported through CALM, our mentoring program, Take Hold and through our outreach support service, The Street University.

To enquire about coming to PALM, you can call us yourself or a parent or health worker can call on your behalf.

For more information on Ted Noffs Foundation programs, visit https://noffs.org.au

ATCA Standard

The ATCA Standard has achieved certification with the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand (JAS-ANZ) the government-appointed accreditation body for Australia and New Zealand, responsible for providing accreditation of conformity assessment bodies (CABs) in the fields of certification and inspection. Accreditation by JAS-ANZ demonstrates the competence and independence of these CABs.

Certification by JAS-ANZ has brought to a conclusion more than 12 years of work by the ATCA Board, beginning with the 2002 Towards Better Practice in Therapeutic Communities project, and the development of the Modified Essential Elements Questionnaire (MEEQ), which became the basis of the ATCA Standards project, funded in 2008 by the Australian Government.

The ATCA Standard provides a two-tiered approach to certification for residential rehabilitation services (Performance Expectations 1-6) and therapeutic communities (Performance Expectations 1-13).  All are based on the Essential Elements (ATCAEE) which were modified in consultation with the membership in 2002, to 79 statements, divided under three broad headings:

  • TC Ethos (21 statements)
  • Aspects of program delivery (50 statements)
  • Quality assurance (8 statements)

In addition to the ATCA Standard, the ATCA Board in consultation with the membership, has developed a series of Interpretive Guides to provide examples of the way in which the criteria contained in the ATCA Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services Standard might be interpreted. They are not intended to be a definitive guide, but rather to provide a framework for reviewers and agencies to both prepare for and to review against the ATCA Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services Standard.

The First Interpretive Guide to the Australasian Therapeutic Communities Association Standard for Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services was released in July 2013.  This was followed in 2015 by the Interpretive Guide for Youth Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services.  The second edition of this guide (March 2017) is included below.

A special working group was then established to develop a third Interpretive Guide – this time the Interpretive Guide for Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Clients and Residents.  This Interpretive Guide has been designed for use by Residential Rehabilitation and Therapeutic Community services whose prime population are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander resident and client groups.

ATCA has formed a partnership with Breaking New Ground (BNG) to offer ATCA members and organisations wishing to adopt the ATCA Standard, with an online service that provides an easy, electronic system for managing quality, risk and compliance.   The Standards and Performance Pathways (SPP) is a patented online platform and integrated quality management system for service provider organisations and assessors.

ATCA has its own tailored version of the SPP – the ATCA Quality Portal, carrying the ATCA Standard for Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services. The ATCA Quality Portal features quality standards assessments, an automatically generated quality improvement plan, with guides and resources to support organisations in meeting the ATCA Standard, as well as other relevant quality or service standards.

Through the standards cross referencing system, a way of completing multiple sets of standards through a single assessment process is provided. It also provides progress graphs, benchmarking, global reporting, as well as a document management system and compliance registers, with calendar and email alerts.

The general SPP is now used widely by service providers, peak bodies and government departments throughout Australia. For more information about the ATCA Quality Portal and the 15% discount to ATCA members, please refer to the information below.

ATCAQP

Please download the ATCA Standard and Interpretive Guide below:

The Salvation Army William Booth House – WBH


Phone: (02) 9212 2322
Fax: (02) 9281 9771

56-60 Albion St
SURRY HILLS NSW 2010
PO Box 209
SURRY HILLS NSW 2010
Email: [email protected]
Web Address: www.salvos.org.au/recovery

William Booth House Recovery Services is an alcohol and other drug treatment service operated by The Salvation Army in the heart of Sydney, providing:

  • Withdrawal management: Up to seven days detoxification from alcohol and other drugs (10 beds). The program is fully-funded by the Ministry of Health and requires no cost of behalf of the client.
  • The Bridge Program: a residential alcohol and other drug treatment service for adults, also available for people with gambling addiction (94 beds)

The Bridge Program is a recovery-orientated, residential treatment program, delivered in the context of a modified therapeutic community. It incorporates a range of interventions and recovery therapy models, including: one-on-one case management, cognitive behavioural therapy, 12-Step recovery, and motivational enhancement strategies. The Bridge Program incorporates spiritual support, recreational activities, health care, family involvement and vocational education and training.

 

The Salvation Army – Townsville Recovery Services

Phone: (07) 4772 3607
Fax: (07) 4772 3174

4-36 John Melton Black Drive
GARBUTT QLD 4814

PO Box 239
GARBUTT EAST QLD 4814

Email: [email protected]
Web Address: www.salvos.org.au/recovery

 

Townsville Recovery Services is an alcohol, other drug and gambling treatment service operated by The Salvation Army which provides:

  • Withdrawal management: case managed detoxification from alcohol and other drugs (8 beds). The program is fully-funded and requires no cost of behalf of the client.
  • The Bridge Program: a residential alcohol, other drug and gambling treatment service for men and women aged 18 and over (44 beds). The Bridge Program is a recovery-orientated, residential treatment program, delivered in the context of a modified therapeutic community. It incorporates a range of interventions and recovery therapy models, including: one-on-one case management, cognitive behavioural therapy, 12-Step recovery, and motivational enhancement strategies. The Bridge Program incorporates spiritual support, recreational activities, health care, family involvement and vocational education and training.
  • Youth & Young Adults Recovery Outreach Service (YYAROS): an Assertive Community Outreach program funded by Queensland Government to provide psychosocial Interventions to 15 to 25 years olds using alcohol and other drugs.

YSAS Birribi

YSAS Birribi

 

 

 

 

Phone: 1800 009 121
Fax: (03) 9430-2301
10 Eucalyptus Road, Eltham 3095
P.O. Box 264 ELTHAM 3095

YSAS (Youth Support and Advocacy Service) is a quality accredited organization that enables young people to build on their strengths and deal with a range of significant issues relating to alcohol and/or drug use, mental health and legal matters. This includes early intervention programs that assist young people and families to prevent the escalation of any problems.

Birribi is a 15-bed Residential Rehabilitation Program, located in the north-east of Melbourne, for young people aged 15-20 years who are endeavouring to manage their alcohol and/or other drug problems. The average program stay is three months.

The holistic program comprises a mix of group and individual therapy, recreational, vocational and educational activities, with an overall focus on community living and shared responsibility.

For more information, visit: www.ysas.org.au

 

WHOS Hunter Valley

WHOS Hunter Valley

Phone:(02) 4991 7000
Fax:(02) 4991 7184
PO Box 628
CESSNOCK NSW 2325
Email: [email protected]
Web Address: www.whos.com.au

WHOS Hunter Valley® TC is a 4 – 6 months Residential Therapeutic Community (TC) for men and women set in the regional area of the Hunter Valley NSW. Its goal is to help individuals find freedom from alcohol and other drug dependence (AOD) and discover a better way of living.
WHOS Hunter Valley (Cessnock, NSW) is funded by the Commonwealth Department of Health and supported by NSW Ministry of Health (HNELHD).

Media Releases

ATCA Conference Press Release – Perth

2011 Awards for Excellence in Drug Treatment

Canberra Times Opinion Piece – NSPs in prisons – 7 January 2011

Prison TC programmes help cut crime 1st November 2010

Opinion piece – Sydney Morning Herald 3rd September 2010

Canberra Times article July 2010

17th September 2009

14th September 2009

21st August 2008

30th May 2008

30th April 2008

14th April 2008

24th February 2008

18th June 2007

21st May 2007

22nd April 2007

23rd March 2007

7th February 2007

Opinion piece – Celebrity Rehab

 

Karralika Programs Inc

Karralika - ADFACT

Phone: 02 61630200
Fax: 0262827777
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.karralika.org.au

ABOUT KARRALIKA PROGRAMS INC

Karralika Programs Inc, a not for profit organisation offering individualised, case-managed treatment options for adults with alcohol and other drug dependencies and their children. Operating in the ACT for over 35 years, Karralika Programs Inc. supports the Canberra community and surrounding NSW regions.

We offer residential care as well as community-based treatment. The Karralika Therapeutic Community offers evidence-based treatment and rehabilitative care for people with alcohol and other drug dependencies, using a therapeutic community (TC) approach to treatment. We provide short and long stay adult and family programs allowing young children up to the age of 12 to accompany their parents through treatment We work with the family to develop positive parent/child/family relationships. We also operate the Nexus Program (incorporating the Men’s Halfway House Program and After-care Program) which offers case management, support, education and referral for single men. All clients leaving our programs have access to ongoing support through outreach.

Karralika Programs works in partnership with ACT Corrective Services to operate the Solaris Therapeutic Community, a voluntary program for adult males in the Alexander Maconochie Centre who have been affected by alcohol and other drug use and related dependencies using the therapeutic community approach to treatment.

We are able to support people with complex needs associated with their alcohol and drug dependence. Residents with low literacy, Acquired Brain Injury or Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder are supported with additional resources and tools to help them participate effectively in the program. Adults with low to moderate mental health conditions who are, or can be stable on medication are also able to participate in our programs.

For more information go to our website: www.karralika.org.au