Good Hope Story

Good Hope Story

This is very likely one of the hardest stories I have ever given. I will take you back to the age of thirteen. This is where my addiction started even though it More »

WHOS Sunshine Coast Client reflection

WHOS Sunshine Coast Client reflection

I was born in Gladstone Qld on the 23/10/1979.  My mother and father separated when I was one year of age. Mum found a new boyfriend who was her partner til I More »

WHOS New Beginnings Client Story

WHOS New Beginnings Client Story

My life before I got to New Beginnings was very depressing. I was out of control in so many ways. I had recently moved back from Mt Isa and was in a More »

WHOS MTAR Client Story

WHOS MTAR Client Story

Prior to coming to WHOS MTAR my life was unmanageable to the extent where even going to the chemist to pick up my methadone was a struggle. I was stuck in a More »

WHOS Gunyah Client Story

WHOS Gunyah Client Story

I was surrounded by drugs from an early age. My father was addicted to drugs and there wasn’t many times I did not see him with a beer in hand or some More »

RTOD Client Male 35 years old – 110 mg Methadone

RTOD Client Male 35 years old – 110 mg Methadone

Before I thought about coming to WHOS RTOD I had done about 12 detox programs and thought every time I could stay clean myself. It took a long time to realize this More »

WHOS RTOD Client Female 35 years old – 130 mg Methadone

WHOS RTOD Client Female 35 years old – 130 mg Methadone

Life before WHOS RTOD was absolute hell for me. I have one sister who is alive and 2 brothers deceased. My father passed away last year and my mum is dying from More »

Hunter resident reflections

Hunter resident reflections

What it was like. At the age of 11 it was just natural to me that everyone used drugs, I thought nothing of it. I listened to everyone glorifying it so I More »

Sophie

Sophie

Hi, my name is Sophie and I am an alcoholic. I will be eternally grateful to the Therapeutic Community at Cyrenian House, my counsellor, my very wise sponsor,  my Higher Power, my More »

 

ATCA Standard

The ATCA Standard has achieved certification with the Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand (JAS-ANZ) the government-appointed accreditation body for Australia and New Zealand, responsible for providing accreditation of conformity assessment bodies (CABs) in the fields of certification and inspection. Accreditation by JAS-ANZ demonstrates the competence and independence of these CABs.

Certification by JAS-ANZ has brought to a conclusion more than 12 years of work by the ATCA Board, beginning with the 2002 Towards Better Practice in Therapeutic Communities project, and the development of the Modified Essential Elements Questionnaire (MEEQ), which became the basis of the ATCA Standards project, funded in 2008 by the Australian Government.

The ATCA Standard provides a two-tiered approach to certification for residential rehabilitation services (Performance Expectations 1-6) and therapeutic communities (Performance Expectations 1-13).  All are based on the Essential Elements (ATCAEE) which were modified in consultation with the membership in 2002, to 79 statements, divided under three broad headings:

  • TC Ethos (21 statements)
  • Aspects of program delivery (50 statements)
  • Quality assurance (8 statements)

In addition to the ATCA Standard, the ATCA Board in consultation with the membership, has developed a series of Interpretive Guides to provide examples of the way in which the criteria contained in the ATCA Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services Standard might be interpreted. They are not intended to be a definitive guide, but rather to provide a framework for reviewers and agencies to both prepare for and to review against the ATCA Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services Standard.

The First Interpretive Guide to the Australasian Therapeutic Communities Association Standard for Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services was released in July 2013.  This was followed in 2015 by the Interpretive Guide for Youth Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services.  The second edition of this guide (March 2017) is included below.

A special working group was then established to develop a third Interpretive Guide – this time the Interpretive Guide for Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Clients and Residents.  This Interpretive Guide has been designed for use by Residential Rehabilitation and Therapeutic Community services whose prime population are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander resident and client groups.

ATCA has formed a partnership with Breaking New Ground (BNG) to offer ATCA members and organisations wishing to adopt the ATCA Standard, with an online service that provides an easy, electronic system for managing quality, risk and compliance.   The Standards and Performance Pathways (SPP) is a patented online platform and integrated quality management system for service provider organisations and assessors.

ATCA has its own tailored version of the SPP – the ATCA Quality Portal, carrying the ATCA Standard for Therapeutic Communities and Residential Rehabilitation Services. The ATCA Quality Portal features quality standards assessments, an automatically generated quality improvement plan, with guides and resources to support organisations in meeting the ATCA Standard, as well as other relevant quality or service standards.

Through the standards cross referencing system, a way of completing multiple sets of standards through a single assessment process is provided. It also provides progress graphs, benchmarking, global reporting, as well as a document management system and compliance registers, with calendar and email alerts.

The general SPP is now used widely by service providers, peak bodies and government departments throughout Australia. For more information about the ATCA Quality Portal and the 15% discount to ATCA members, please refer to the information below.

ATCAQP

Please download the ATCA Standard and Interpretive Guide below: