Good Hope Story

Good Hope Story

This is very likely one of the hardest stories I have ever given. I will take you back to the age of thirteen. This is where my addiction started even though it More »

WHOS Sunshine Coast Client reflection

WHOS Sunshine Coast Client reflection

I was born in Gladstone Qld on the 23/10/1979.  My mother and father separated when I was one year of age. Mum found a new boyfriend who was her partner til I More »

WHOS New Beginnings Client Story

WHOS New Beginnings Client Story

My life before I got to New Beginnings was very depressing. I was out of control in so many ways. I had recently moved back from Mt Isa and was in a More »

WHOS MTAR Client Story

WHOS MTAR Client Story

Prior to coming to WHOS MTAR my life was unmanageable to the extent where even going to the chemist to pick up my methadone was a struggle. I was stuck in a More »

WHOS Gunyah Client Story

WHOS Gunyah Client Story

I was surrounded by drugs from an early age. My father was addicted to drugs and there wasn’t many times I did not see him with a beer in hand or some More »

RTOD Client Male 35 years old – 110 mg Methadone

RTOD Client Male 35 years old – 110 mg Methadone

Before I thought about coming to WHOS RTOD I had done about 12 detox programs and thought every time I could stay clean myself. It took a long time to realize this More »

WHOS RTOD Client Female 35 years old – 130 mg Methadone

WHOS RTOD Client Female 35 years old – 130 mg Methadone

Life before WHOS RTOD was absolute hell for me. I have one sister who is alive and 2 brothers deceased. My father passed away last year and my mum is dying from More »

Hunter resident reflections

Hunter resident reflections

What it was like. At the age of 11 it was just natural to me that everyone used drugs, I thought nothing of it. I listened to everyone glorifying it so I More »

Sophie

Sophie

Hi, my name is Sophie and I am an alcoholic. I will be eternally grateful to the Therapeutic Community at Cyrenian House, my counsellor, my very wise sponsor,  my Higher Power, my More »

 

Resources

Australian and New Zealand Evaluation Tools and Guidelines

Review of the Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set, January 2011

Alcohol and other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set 2012-2013: Specifications and Collection Manual

Diagnostic screening tool

Screening, Assessment and Evaluation: AOD, smoking and gambling. Matua Raki, National Addiction Workforce Development, New Zealand

Te Whare Tapa Whã: Maori Health Model

The Case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand

 

Education and Reviews

Towards better practice in therapeutic communities

Scottish Addiction Studies on-line library

Individual Study Project

NIDA Report – What is a Therapeutic Community?

The Drug Misuse – UK Psychosocial Guideline

Addiction Treatment is Everybody’s Business: Where to from here? National Committee for Addiction Treatment, New Zealand 2011

Competencies for Substance Abuse Treatment Clinical Supervisors TAP 21-A, US Department of Health and Human Services, SAMHSA, 2007

Let’s Get Real: Guide for Managers and Leaders, New Zealand Ministry of Health, 2009

Defining Drug Courts: The Key Components, US Department of Justice, 2004

Working with People in the Criminal Justice Sector: Reflective Workbook. Matua Raki, National Addiction Workforce Development, New ZealandSupporting New Zealand’s Therapeutic Community Workforce: An investigation of current needs. A scoping report developed by Matua Raki for the Ministry of Health

 

Research Papers

Magor-Blatch, L.E., Keen, J.L., & Bhullar, N. (2013). Personality factors as predictors of program completion of drug therapeutic communities Mental Health and Substance Use. doi.org/10.1080/17523281.2013.806345

Gholab, K. M. & Magor-Blatch, L.E. (2013). Predictors of retention in “Transitional” Rehabilitation: Dynamic versus Static Client Variables. Therapeutic Communities: International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 34(1) 16-29.                                                                                                                                                            Gholab, K. & Magor-Blatch, L.E. Predictors of retention

Lifeline through Art, Odyssey House NSW. Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser, Wednesday 5/12/2012
Lifeline through Art – Odyssey House NSW

Smith, B., Gailitis, L. & Bowen, D.J. (2012). A preliminary evaluation of Goldbridge adventure therapy substance abuse treatment program. Unpublished manuscript, Goldbridge Rehabilitation Services, Southport, Australia.
Goldbridge Bowen (2012) A preliminary evaluation

International Journal of Therapeutic Communities, 31(2) Summer 2010
International Journal Therapeutic Communities, 2010, 31(2)

James Pitts, Cost benefits of Therapeutic Community programming. Den Haag, June 2009
James Pitts – Cost benefits of TCs

Magor-Blatch, L. (2008). Substance use in the 21st Century: Different or More of the Same? In Psych,3(5). The Australian Psychological Society
Magor-Blatch, L. (2008) InPsych

Stace, S. (2007). Individual Study Project: Are staff training needs adequately addressed in Therapeutic Communities in relation to working with residents who have a diagnosis of personality Disorder? Stirling University, UK.
Stace, Individual Study Project on Therapeutic Communities

Darke, S., Williamson, A., Ross, J., & Teesson, M. (2006). Residential Rehabilitation for the Treatment of Heroin dependence: Sustained Heroin Abstinence and Drug Related Harm 2 years after Treatment Entrance. Addictive Disorders & Their Treatment, 5(1), 9-18
Darke, S., Williamson, A., Ross, J. & Teesson, M. (2006). Residential_Rehabilitation_for_the_Treatment_of.2[1]

James Pitts, Possible contributing factors to the deterioration of client profiles at Odyssey House, WFTC Conference, Spain 2004
James Pitts – Possible Contributors to deterioration Client Profiles

National Institute on Drug Abuse (2002). What is a Therapeutic Community?
Therapeutic Communities Research 03

Waters, G. (2001). The Case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand.
Waters, The case for AOD Treatment Courts in New Zealand 2011

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Australia 2009-10: report on the National Minimum Data Set
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420496

Around 170,000 treatment episodes for alcohol and other drug use were provided in Australia in 2009-10. Almost half were for treatment related to alcohol use-the highest proportion observed since the collection began in 2001. As with previous years, counselling was the most common type of treatment offered. One in ten episodes involved more than one type of treatment.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in New South Wales 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420789

In New South Wales in 2009-10, 258 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies and outlets provided 35,202 treatment episodes. This was an increase of eight treatment agencies and 309 episodes compared to 2008-09.Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern, rising from 51% of episodes in 2008-09 to 54% in 2009-10. Cannabis accounted for 18% and heroin for 10% of episodes. The proportion of amphetamine-related episodes fell slightly from 9% to 7%. Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (34% of episodes), followed by withdrawal management (20%) and assessment only (16%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Western Australia 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420899

In Western Australia in 2009–10, 52 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 17,187 treatment episodes. This was an increase of eight treatment agencies and 272 treatment episodes compared with 2008–09. The median1 ages of persons receiving treatment for their own drug use (30) and those seeking assistance for someone else’s drug use (47) were similar to 2008–09. Alcohol (49%), cannabis (19%) and amphetamines (14%) were again the top three drugs of concern. As in 2008–09, counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (63% of episodes), followed by withdrawal management (8%), rehabilitation and information and education only (both 6%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Queensland 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420900

In Queensland in 2009-10, 118 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 23,090 treatment episodes. Alcohol and cannabis were the most common principal drugs of concern at 38% and 36% of treatment episodes respectively, followed by opioids (8%).The greatest proportion of treatment episodes was for information and education only (42%) followed by counselling (28%) and assessment only (17%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in the Australian Capital Territory 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420901

In the Australian Capital Territory in 2009-10, 10 publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 3,585 treatment episodes. Alcohol was the most common principal drug of concern (55%), followed by cannabis (17%) and heroin (14%). These proportions were similar to the previous year. Episodes reporting amphetamines as their principal drug of concern dropped by 3 percentage points from 9% in 2008-09 to 6% in 2009-10. The most common form of treatment in 2009-10 was counselling accounting for 30% of treatment episodes, followed by withdrawal management (21%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in the Northern Territory 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420902

In the Northern Territory in 2009-10, 20 government-funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 3,798 treatment episodes. This represented one less treatment agency and around 40 extra treatment episodes compared with 2008-09. Alcohol was the principal drug on concern for 69% of treatment episodes in 2009-10 the highest proportion of all states and territories. The most common form of main treatment provided was assessment only (39% of episodes), followed by counselling (21%), and rehabilitation (16%). The proportion of clients receiving withdrawal management (detoxification) as their main treatment fell from 15% of episodes in 2008-09 to 7% in 2009-10.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Victoria 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420903

In Victoria, 138 publicly funded alcohol and other drug treatment agencies and outlets supplying data provided 52,133 treatment episodes in 2009-10. This was an increase of two agencies and about 5,000 treatment episodes compared with 2008-09. Alcohol (46%), cannabis (23%), opioids (19%, with heroin alone accounting for 14%), and amphetamines (5%) were the most common principal drugs of concern. Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided (accounting for 51% of episodes) followed by withdrawal management (detoxification) (19%) and support and case management only (13%).

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in South Australia 2009-10: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=10737420904

In South Australia in 2009-10, 59 publicly-funded government and non-government alcohol and other drug treatment agencies provided 9,092 treatment episodes. This was an increase of four treatment agencies but a decrease of 572 treatment episodes from 2008-09. Alcohol was again the most common principal drug of concern (56%), followed by amphetamines (11%) and cannabis (10%). Counselling was the most common form of main treatment provided in 2009-10 (accounting for 27% of episodes) a change from recent years, in which the predominant treatment type was assessment only.

Alcohol and other drug treatment services in Tasmania 2008-09: findings from the National Minimum Data Set (NMDS)
http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=6442475597

This data bulletin summarises the main findings from the 2008-09 Alcohol and Other Drug Treatment Services National Minimum Data Set (AODTS-NMDS) for Tasmania.

 

Australian Government’s National Drug Strategy 2010-2015
http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/internet/drugstrategy/publishing.nsf/Content/DB4076D49F13309FCA257854007BAF30/$File/nds2015.pdf

http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/internet/drugstrategy/publishing.nsf/Content/545C92F95DF8C76ACA257162000DA780/$File/indigeval-final.pdf

 

Australian Government’s National Drug Strategy

http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Complimentary Action Plan 2003-2009

 

 

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